The Glass Dabber in Your Dab Kit May Not Be the Best Option for You

Glass Dabber in Your Dab Kit May Not Be the Best Option for You Getting set up for a great dabbing experience can be a little complicated for a first time user. Sifting through the selection of rigs can be overwhelming not to mention choosing from the variety of concentrates available. By the time you're ready to actually dab, you may realize that you've forgotten one of the most essential tools for enjoying the perfect dab experience. That tool is a dabber and, like all other aspects of dabbing, it's important to do a little research before going ahead and picking a tool.

What to Look for in Dab Tools

glass dabber can be useful in preserving flavor of waxes and shatters Dabbing tools are available in various shapes and materials. You will need the perfect tool for your rig and your concentrate to have a hassle-free experience. Part of this also involves choosing a tool that can withstand high temperatures and this requires you to evaluate which material you will choose for your tool: glass, quartz, titanium or ceramic. You also want to make sure the tool is capable of delivering your concentrate without leaving behind too much residue. You don't want to lose half your concentrate to your dabbing tool. For those who are style conscious, you may want your tool to match your rig (ie. a glass dabber makes sense for a glass rig).

More Than a Matter of Taste

Titanium nails are a popular choice, however it's important to choose a medical grade quality. You want to taste your concentrate, not metal. Likewise, you don't want to ingest the nasty toxins of subquality dab tools that contribute to that foul taste. Stainless steel dabber tools also run the risk of coming with some undesired metallic tastes and toxins with your dab. For those who want a healthier, cleaner tasting option, a glass dabber will do the job although you will have to make sure it is heat resistant. When choosing a glass dabber, be sure to get a thicker one that is less likely to break.

Shape is Relative to Concentrate

consistency of your marijuana concentrates informs what kind of dab tool you should use If you're a fan of the traditional shatter as a choice in concentrates then a pointed, thin-tipped tool akin to a dental tip may be the dabber for you. These are adept at carving smaller pieces of shatter away from larger pieces. This type of tool has such a small surface area that you can choose the quantity you want with ease and very little residue will be left behind. For those who enjoy crumbles, waxes or harder shatters that turn to powder, a spatula or spoon-shaped tip may be the right tool for you. For anyone using a domeless rig, a carb cap is a crucial instrument to add to your kit. Sometimes the vapor on your nail will burn too cold or slow to inhale in a single hit. You may need to try multiple times to consume all the vapor, especially if you’ve just started dabbing. Carb caps trap the heat and the vapor so that nothing is lost during this process. The right tools make all the difference to your dabbing experience. At the end of the day, finding the right tools for you may be as simple as asking the right questions about what will work best with your concentrate and rig. Save yourself the frustration by doing a bit of homework and starting out with the right dab tools for your specific experience.
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Comments

Warner Pedelty - December 7, 2018

This would be so perfect for my nieces

Jerrold Protsman - December 7, 2018

Keep in mind that Holistic Harry is fiction! Also, you haven’t read the end yet … but, yes, it is more or less autobiographical. I’m not so much cynical about alternative medicine as deeply disappointed. For those interested, it’s available here: http://www.mendosa.com/Confessions.pdfThis is really going to get me a lot of hatemail … however, keep in mind that I nail the quackbuster in the story too!

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