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States Sue Colorado Over Marijuana Distribution

nebraska colorado marijuana Colorado may be in hot "bong" water over a newly filed lawsuit brought up by attorney generals in Nebraska and Oklahoma. According to reports, the new lawsuit is asking the United States Supreme Court to limit key aspects of the 2012 voter-approved ballot measure that legalized marijuana in Colorado for adults and established new protocols for marijuana businesses. Officials from Colorado's surrounding states which are now suing, claim that Colorado has "created a dangerous gap" in the federal drug management system, by allowing large quantities of marijuana to cross state lines. “Marijuana flows from this gap into neighboring states,” the suit says, undermining their marijuana bans, “draining their treasuries, and placing stress on their criminal justice systems," according to reports. Adding to the contentious sentiment, Nebraska and Oklahoma law enforcement officials are backing up the suit with complaints, saying that they have seen an increase in marijuana entering their state lines from Colorado since legalization began in January. Attorney generals Scott Pruit of Oklahoma and Jon Bruning of Nebraska, the makers of the lawsuit,  accuse Colorado officials of scheming to cultivate, package, and distribute marijuana between state lines while "ignoring every objective embodied in the federal drug control regulation.” In defense of marijuana legalization in Colorado, advocates such as Michael Elliot, executive director of the Marijuana Industry Group,  are making the point that if the lawsuit succeeds in shutting down marijuana dispensaries, this would only increase black market sales. “If Nebraska and Oklahoma succeed, they will put the violent criminal organizations back in charge," said Elliot to the NY Times. Making matters even worse, despite Nebraska and Oklahoma's smear campaign against Colorado, no mention is made in the suit of concrete, statistical data backing up the claims about Colorado-related marijuana arrests or seizures. No concrete evidence combined with earlier reports from law enforcement officials claiming that they had in fact not seen an influx of marijuana coming from Colorado, should be red flags that the suit is unreasonably invalid.      
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